Mill


Table of Contents

Modules

TasksCross Builds

Mill modules are objects extending mill.Module, and let you group related tasks together to keep things neat and organized. Mill's comes with built in modules such as mill.scalalib.ScalaModule and mill.scalalib.CrossSbtModule, but you can use modules for other purposes as well.

Using Modules

The path to a Mill module from the root of your build file corresponds to the path you would use to run tasks within that module from the command line. e.g. for the following build:

object foo extends mill.Module {
  def bar = T { "hello" }
  object baz extends mill.Module {
    def qux = T { "world" } 
  } 
}

You would be able to run the two targets via mill foo.bar or mill foo.baz.qux. You can use mill show foo.bar or mill show foo.baz.qux to make Mill echo out the string value being returned by each Target. The two targets will store their output metadata & files at ./out/foo/bar and ./out/foo/baz/qux respectively.

Modules also provide a way to define and re-use common collections of tasks, via Scala traits. For example, you can define your own FooModule trait:

trait FooModule extends mill.Module {
  def bar = T { "hello" }
  def baz = T { "world" }
}

And use it to define multiple modules with the same bar and baz targets, along with any other customizations such as qux:

object foo1 extends FooModule
object foo2 extends FooModule {
  def qux = T { "I am Cow" }
}  

This would make the following targets available from the command line

The built in mill.scalalib package uses this to define mill.scalalib.ScalaModule, mill.scalalib.SbtModule and mill.scalalib.TestScalaModule, all of which contain a set of "standard" operations such as compile jar or assembly that you may expect from a typical Scala module.

Overriding Targets

trait BaseModule extends Module {
  def foo = T { Seq("base") }
  def cmd(i: Int) = T.command { Seq("base" + i) }
}

object canOverrideSuper with BaseModule {
  def foo = T { super.foo() ++ Seq("object") }
  def cmd(i: Int) = T.command { super.cmd(i)() ++ Seq("object" + i) }
}

You can override targets and commands to customize them or change what they do. The overriden version is available via super. You can omit the override keyword in Mill builds.

millSourcePath

Each Module has a millSourcePath field that corresponds to the path that module expects its input files to be on disk. Re-visiting our examples above:

object foo extends mill.Module {
  def bar = T { "hello" }
  object baz extends mill.Module {
    def qux = T { "world" } 
  } 
}

The foo module has a millSourcePath of ./foo, while the foo.baz module has a millSourcePath of ./foo/baz.

You can use millSourcePath to automatically set the source folders of your modules to match the build structure. You are not forced to rigidly use millSourcePath to define the source folders of all your code, but it can simplify the common case where you probably want your build-layout and on-disk-layout to be the same.

E.g. for mill.scalalib.ScalaModule, the Scala source code is assumed by default to be in millSourcePath/"src" while resources are automatically assumed to be in millSourcePath/"resources".

You can override millSourcePath:

object foo extends mill.Module {
  def millSourcePath = super.millSourcePath / "lols"
  def bar = T { "hello" }
  object baz extends mill.Module {
    def qux = T { "world" } 
  } 
}

And any overrides propagate down to the module's children: in the above example, module foo would have its millSourcePath be ./foo/lols while modulefoo.baz would have its millSourcePath be ./foo/lols/baz.

Note that millSourcePath is generally only used for a module's input source files. Output is always in the out/ folder and cannot be changed, e.g. even with the overriden millSourcePath the output paths are still the default ./out/foo/bar and ./out/foo/baz/qux folders.

External Modules

Libraries for use in Mill can define ExternalModules: Modules which are shared between all builds which use that library:

package foo
import mill._

object Bar extends mill.define.ExternalModule {
  def baz = T { 1 }
  def qux() = T.command { println(baz() + 1) }

  lazy val millDiscover = mill.define.Discover[this.type]
}

In the above example, foo.Bar is an ExternalModule living within the foo Java package, containing the baz target and qux command. Those can be run from the command line via:

mill foo.Bar/baz
mill foo.Bar/qux

ExternalModules are useful for someone providing a library for use with Mill that is shared by the entire build: for example, mill.scalalib.ScalaWorkerApi/scalaWorker provides a shared Scala compilation service & cache that is shared between all ScalaModules, and mill.scalalib.GenIdea/idea lets you generate IntelliJ projects without needing to define your own T.command in your build.sc file

Foreign Modules

Mill can load other mill projects from external (or sub) folders, using Ammonite's $file magic import, allowing to depend on foreign modules. This allows, for instance, to depend on other projects' sources, or split your build logic into smaller files.

For instance, assuming the following stucture :

foo/
    build.sc
    bar/
        build.sc 
baz/
    build.sc     

you can write the following in foo/build.sc :


import $file.bar.build
import $file.^.baz.build
import mill._ 

def someFoo = T {

    ^.baz.build.someBaz(...)
    bar.build.someBar(...) 
    ...
}

The output of the foreign tasks will be cached under foo/out/foreign-modules/.


About the Author: Haoyi is a software engineer, an early contributor to Scala.js, and the author of many open-source Scala tools such as Mill, the Ammonite REPL and FastParse.

If you've enjoy using Mill, or enjoyed using Haoyi's other open source libraries, please chip in (or get your Company to chip in!) via Patreon so he can continue his open-source work


TasksCross Builds